Can Cancer Be Predicted And Prevented?

Cancer is quickly rising as one of the leading causes of death in the United States1. In fact, cancer is predicted to become the top cause of worldwide deaths over the course of this century.


While cancer has been around for many years–and, at this point, finds itself to be around for many more–its cure was always emphasized in treatment. Here at HelenHealth, we argue that the best way to beat cancer is at Stage 0–that is, before it ever happens in the first place.


What Is Cancer?

Cancer is a disease in which our body’s cells grow at uncontrollable speeds from any part of our body to other parts of our body2. As human cells perform a process known as cell division, older and more damaged cells become replaced by new cells. However, if, in this process, abnormal cells grow and multiply, these cells can create tumors or lumps of tissue. Cancerous tumors can invade tissues in their surroundings to create new tumors in a process called metastasizing3. This process is the major cause of death by cancer.


The Problem Of The Modern-Day Approach To Cancer

For too long, we have been focused on finding the next cure for cancer. While cure definitely plays a crucial role in our battle against cancer, treatment can only take us so far. Why not focus on defending ourselves against cancer, before it can ever take place?


Today, we are fortunate enough to live in the era of New Health, an emerging breakthrough in healthcare that champions the practice of prediction over cure. When we predict and prevent diseases from happening, we not only reserve our medical resources but avoid detrimental damage to our bodies, strengthen our health against harmful health conditions, and most importantly, save our lives and the lives of those we love.


Luckily, at this age, we are fortunate enough to have the resources and knowledge to predict and prevent certain diseases—with cancer as no exception.


How can cancer be predicted?

Genetic testing is the primary way by which we can detect cancer genes in our bodies. It allows us to estimate our chances of developing cancer in the future4. Companies such as 23andMe, Galleri, Myriad, and more offer commercial genetic tests that you can easily access to determine your general risk for cancer.


How can cancer be prevented?

The World Health Organization (WHO) shares that “a 30-40% cancer burden can be attributed to lifestyle risk factors such as tobacco smoking…a diet low in fruit and vegetables…and physical inactivity.”5 We can see here that prediction is only half the battle against cancer. Prevention through healthy lifestyle changes is a crucial component in ensuring that we maintain a long and healthy life, not just for ourselves but for those we love as well.


Where do I go from here?

HelenHealth is on a mission to end cancer through prediction and prevention. We do this by connecting our community members to the best resources ranging from genetic counseling, fitness coaching, and nutrition guidance. If you would like to learn more about how you can predict and prevent cancer today, reach out to us sam@helenhealth.ai. Our team is readily available to help you fight the battle against cancer today.


Stay Healthy,


Samantha Ackary


Sources

  1. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/magazine/magazine_article/the-cancer-miracle-isnt-a-cure-its-prevention/

  2. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/what-is-cancer#:~:text=Pittsburgh%20Cancer%20Institute-,The%20Definition%20of%20Cancer,up%20of%20trillions%20of%20cells.

  3. https://www.who.int/health-topics/cancer#tab=tab_1

  4. https://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/cancer-basics/genetics/genetic-testing-cancer-risk

  5. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/cancer/preventing-cancer/

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